Go Vote Together

THIS IS HOW WE CLAIM OUR POWER.

THIS IS THE PARTY OF THE YEAR.

ELECTION DAY IS FINALLY HERE.

It’s time to get together with your friends, head to the polls, and make your voices heard!

Do your part to keep our democracy going strong. It’s easy to feel like politicians are the ones with all the power, but their power comes from our vote, so use it wisely and often!

Make your vote count by giving it to the people and the causes you care about. This is your chance to grab your friends, put your vote plan into action, and be an invaluable part of democracy!

Photography: Dan Battista. Design: Rick Morri.

WHAT TO BRING

BEFORE YOU HEAD TO THE POLLS

Click here for more info.
  • Driver's License
  • Identification Card
  • Student ID
  • Passport

Two-thirds of states in the US require you to bring a form of ID in order to vote, and about half of the states require photo ID.

Click here for more info.
  • Filled-in Ballot
  • Voter Guide

Feel informed and prepared on voting day. Your ballot may be several pages long. Don’t let this dissuade you from voting on every issue!

Click here for more info.
  • Postmarked
  • Stamp
  • Mail or Drop Off

If you voted by mail your ballot needs to be postmarked on or before election day, or you can deliver it to your polling place the day of the election.

BRING FRIENDS

  • Ride together
  • Stay in line!
  • Listen to music or play a game

Every polling place is different and the wait time may vary. In states with higher rates of voter suppression, they are often intentionally long to discourage voters. Don’t let them win!

FORM OF ID

Two-thirds of states in the US require you to bring a form of ID in order to vote, and about half of the states require photo ID.

  • Driver's License
  • Identification Card
  • Military ID
  • Passport

SAMPLE BALLOT

Feel informed and prepared on voting day. Your ballot may be several pages long. Don’t let this dissuade you from voting on every issue!

  • Filled-in Ballot
  • Voter Guide

MAIL-IN BALLOT

If you voted by mail your ballot needs to be postmarked on or before election day, or you can deliver it to your polling place the day of the election.

  • Postmarked
  • Stamp
  • Mail or Drop Off

BRING A FRIEND!

Every polling place is different and the wait time may vary. In states with higher rates of voter suppression, they are often intentionally long to discourage voters. Don’t let them win!

  • Stay in line
  • Listen to music or play a game

Election Day Problems?

Report an election problem by calling:

  • 1-866-OUR-VOTE (866-687-8683)
  • 1-888-VE-Y-VOTA (en Español)
  • 1-888-API-VOTE (Asian multilingual assistance)
  • 1-844-YALLA-US (Arabic)

Assistance Provided by Vote 411.

Learn more with these great resources:

TROUBLE-SHOOTING

MAKE SURE YOUR VOTE IS COUNTED!

Frequently Asked Questions

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS.

In most states, you can still cast your vote!

If you are turned away for not having a photo ID, tell them you want to cast a provisional ballot. You may also be asked to sign an additional form or two to affirm your identity. They might also ask you to come back to show an acceptable form of ID within a few days.

 

Whatever you do, don’t leave until you’ve filled out and submitted a provisional ballot and spoken to the poll worker about what you need to do to make sure they affirm your identity so your vote counts!

 

There are three states that DO NOT provide provisional ballots. They are Minnesota, New Hampshire and Idaho. In New Hampshire, you can register on the same day as the general election.

That’s okay, if you arrived to your polling place within polling time they MUST let you vote.

You can pass the time by chatting with a friend, scrolling through your phone, reading a book, or playing a game like 20 Questions or Eye Spy. Remember: If you're in line when polls close, you are able to vote. Check out the opening and closing times of your state's polling places!

 

Voting early? Early voting centers may not be your polling place. Be sure to check with your local secretary of state or board of elections.

Don’t worry, in most states your boss is legally required to give you time off to vote.

The exact parameters of this law vary state by state, but for the most part you should be given ample time to go to your polling place without it disrupting your work. Just ask your boss when the best time is for you to go.

That’s okay.

You may be at the wrong location, or you may have been unfairly unregistered in an attempt at voter suppression. This is your chance to make sure your voice is heard.

 

If they aren’t able to tell you where your correct polling place is, then it is your right to fill out a provisional ballot. Show your photo ID if you have it and make sure they take your name down. Ask for a provisional ballot receipt. If you have any problems, you can call the Voter Protection hotline (866-OUR-VOTE).

 

There are three states that DO NOT provide provisional ballots. They are Minnesota, New Hampshire and Idaho. In New Hampshire, you can register on the same day as the general election.

That’s okay, many states offer same-day registration on election day at your polling place.

Just be sure to bring your photo ID so you can register when you get there. To triple check your registration status and whether your state allows same day registration, head to vote.org.

You cannot be denied the right to vote because your gender doesn’t match your ID. You cannot be denied the right to vote because you are trans.

If you know your ID doesn’t match your name and are worried it might be an issue, bring a utility bill with your name as a backup.If you are still being denied your right to vote, seek out a volunteer attorney who may be there helping voters.If all else fails, insist on filling out a provisional ballot and call the National Election Protection Hotline at 1-866 OUR-VOTE (1- 866-687-8683) for help.

Polling places are required by law to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act guidelines for an accessible polling place.

However, if your polling place is not accessible to you, a friend, or a family member, please call the ADA helpline at 800-514-0301 (Voice) and 800-514-0383 (TTY).

HAVE ANOTHER QUESTION?

If you have other questions not listed here, you can reach out to our friends at League of Women Voters, or contact your local branches of ACLU or NAACP.

Need a Refresher?

Party all the way to Election Day.

Overwhelmed?
We've got your back.

Voting can be intimidating, but it doesn't have to be difficult.

Get ahead of the game with A Band of Voter's interactive vote plan, voting checklists, ballot and representative lookups, and more. And it's even easier when you check them out with friends.

Share with Others

We have power in numbers. Help spread the word and let others know that you will claim your power on Election Day.
Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on reddit
Share on whatsapp